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Ceramic pot made from clay collected from the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in Northern Mexico and painted with locally-sourced mineral pigments.

TERESA MARGOLLES

Doce Crónicas (Marzo 2022), 2021-22

Ceramic pot made from clay collected from the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in Northern Mexico and painted with locally-sourced mineral pigments.

17 x 16 x 16 in.
43.2 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm

 

JCG12950.7

Ceramic pot made from clay collected from the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in Northern Mexico and painted with locally-sourced mineral pigments.

TERESA MARGOLLES

Doce Crónicas (Junio 2022), 2021-22

Ceramic pot made from clay collected from the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in Northern Mexico and painted with locally-sourced mineral pigments.

18 x 16 x 16 in.
45.7 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm

 

JCG12950.10

Ceramic pot made from clay collected from the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in Northern Mexico and painted with locally-sourced mineral pigments.

TERESA MARGOLLES

Doce Crónicas (Febrero 2022), 2021-22

Ceramic pot made from clay collected from the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in Northern Mexico and painted with locally-sourced mineral pigments.

19 x 16 x 16 in.
48.3 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm

 

JCG12950.6

Tan ceramic pot with painted motifs and trucks by Teresa Margolles

TERESA MARGOLLES

Doce Crónicas (Abril 2022), 2021-22

20 x 16 x 16 in.
50.8 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm

 

JCG12950.8

t features close-up autopsy photographs Margolles took in Guadalajara, Mexico in 2005

TERESA MARGOLLES

Línea Fronteriza, 2005 - ongoing

Pigmented inkjet color print on cotton paper

32 in. x 90 ft 9 in.

81 cm x 27 m 66 cm

Edition of 3 plus 1 artist's proof

 

JCG14746

Press Release

James Cohan is pleased to present Lo que hemos perdido / What we lost, an exhibition of new work by Teresa Margolles, on view from October 15 to November 12 at 52 Walker Street. This is the artist’s second solo exhibition at James Cohan. The gallery will host an opening reception on Saturday, October 15 from 6 - 8 PM. 

 

In her ongoing investigation of the social and aesthetic dimensions of conflict, Teresa Margolles visualizes the enduring weight of violence. By infusing artwork with material traces of loss, she shares the stories of the disenfranchised in ways that are acutely visceral, confronting viewers physically and emotionally.


For this exhibition, Margolles will present a series of painted ceramic vessels from her continued collaboration with artisans in the Northern Mexican state of Chihuahua, near the U.S./Mexico border. Located in the region near the prehistoric Paquimé archaeological zone or Casas Grandes (the place of the big houses) the ceramicists have suffered greatly from the escalating violence in the area.

 

To explore the exhibition in our Online Viewing Room, please click here

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